First appearance for "the new ones"

You can’t miss it: like a warning sign, a single weapon hangs on the front wall in the gallery of the KVD – and nothing else. Sculptor Christian Engelmann called this work “Self-loader”. If you look up, another murder weapon threatens to run gigantic, the “Superlongdistancerifle”. A few paces further, a gilded rifle shows off under a glass case like an ancient idol.

But not just any gun fanatics have conquered the KVD gallery, rather they are part of the exhibition “The New Ones”, which also includes Christian Engelmann. The artist quintet is completed by Michael Braun, Margarita Platis, Marian Wiesner and Kristina Seeholzer. They are not all new members of the KVD, the Dachau artists’ association. But the corona pandemic has so far prevented them from exhibiting their works.

The “weapon collection” raises fears

Christian Engelmann has already caused a stir at the big KVD summer campaign 2019 “KVD RAUS” with his giant ski jump on the old town slope and is now represented with the uncanny “weapon collection”. One looks at these killers with a mixture of disgust for the subject and admiration for the artistic examination of war and violence, with arms deals and war profiteers. One’s own fears of the unforeseeable consequences of the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine are boiling up like a volcano about to erupt, and anger at Putin, who caused this war, is rising and rising.

KVD gallery Dachau: The gold-plated rifle is part of Christian Engelmann's

The gold-plated rifle is part of Christian Engelmann’s “Weapons Collection”.

(Photo: Niels P. Jørgensen)

KVD-Galerie Dachau: Kristina Seeholzer's linocuts, like this curious dachshund, which a long-haired man is looking at pensively, have an impression of reminiscences of carefree times.

Kristina Seeholzer’s linocuts, such as this inquisitive dachshund that a long-haired man is looking at pensively, have an impression of reminiscences of carefree times.

(Photo: Niels P. Jørgensen)

KVD Gallery Dachau: Among Michael Braun's graphic works, a current screen print with Cyrillic writing from 2022 is particularly striking: the artist called it

Among Michael Braun’s graphic works, a current screen print with Cyrillic script from 2022 is particularly striking: the artist called it “Peace Message”.

(Photo: Niels P. Jørgensen)

It’s a good thing that the eye now falls on a harmonious color composition by Marian Wiesner in this cleverly arranged show. He painted 32 basswood rectangles with icon painting pigments, applied gold leaf to some, and meticulously assembled them into one large rectangular object. This strict arrangement and the almost imperceptible color transitions have an almost magical effect on the viewer. You can literally lose yourself in it, come to rest. Three compositions made of linen “handmade and from our own (flax) cultivation”, as the short description says, can easily be seen as a symbol of Wiesner’s close connection with nature. Possibly also as a reminder to treat what she gives us with respect.

The title “Pharisee” is at least as Janus-faced as the work itself

Michael Braun’s works want to be explored piece by piece, they are so multifaceted and complex. There’s like two thin white arms outstretched, grasping at a broken chair with two back wheels. Thick iron chains wind on and around the chair. Did they tie up a slumped body, its legs hanging lifeless, replacing the legs of a chair? Is it an old person, deprived of their freedom and dignity in the home or elsewhere? The answer is left to the viewer, because the title “Pharisee” of this installation is at least as Janus-faced as the work itself. Among Braun’s graphic works, a current screen print from 2022 is particularly striking: Braun called it “Peace Message”. It’s a shame that the Cyrillic letters can only be deciphered by people who know Russian.

Fairytale-like mystical, completely without spirits and ghosts, Margarita Platis shows nature from its mysterious side in her screen prints and photographs. They are enchanted images of the cycle of becoming and passing away. If you look a little closer, they exude something alluring, almost as if you are about to enter forbidden territory. In these works the imagination can go for a walk.

Kristina Seeholzer’s linocut prints have an impression of reminiscences of carefree times: two kids sitting well-behaved next to each other, everyday scenes from Italy or Vietnam, and last but not least an inquisitive dachshund that a long-haired man is looking at pensively. This whets the appetite for more insights and perspectives – just like the entire exciting exhibition: It is an exciting exhibition in the best sense of the word and, thanks to its contrasts, particularly intense.

Opening hours of the KVD gallery: Thursday to Saturday 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. On view until October 9th.

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